Punk outfit the Descendents, release COOL TO BE YOU, the first new album from the Descendents in over 7 years. Featuring 14 new songs that will undoubtedly whet the appetite of the starving punk rockers need to rock.
Punk outfit the Descendents, release COOL TO BE YOU, the first new album from the Descendents in over 7 years. Featuring 14 new songs that will undoubtedly whet the appetite of the starving punk rockers need to rock.
751097067222

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Format: CD
Label: FWR
Catalog: 672
Rel. Date: 03/23/2004
UPC: 751097067222

Cool To Be You
Artist: Descendents
Format: CD
New: Not in stock
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Punk outfit the Descendents, release COOL TO BE YOU, the first new album from the Descendents in over 7 years. Featuring 14 new songs that will undoubtedly whet the appetite of the starving punk rockers need to rock.

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''Cool To Be You'' is the 2004 release by the punk band The Descendents on the label Fat Wreck Chords. It was their first studio album since 1996's ''Everything Sucks''. Upon its release, it peaked at 143 on the Billboard Top 200 and 6 on the Top Independent Album charts. - Wikipedia

So many bands stole (and ruined) the Descendents' style it's a relief to finally have the real McCoy back-and sounding even better than the last time they came back, with 1996's first-rate Everything Sucks. They haven't changed an iota since their 1982 landmark Milo Goes to College, but with songs this catchy, so what? Bill Stevenson remains a propulsive drummer, blasting out mighty snare and tom fills, while bassist Karl Alvarez and chrome-domed guitarist Stephen Egerton feed off his power-push with a stretched-to-breaking dash. But of course these three also do the same for the undervalued All-the core of the Descendents' appeal is the universally beloved Milo Aukerman.

Other singers are also smart, sincere, nakedly honest, or simply expressive. But none combines these qualities as thoroughly as Aukerman, whom you'd swear was your closest friend. On "Maddie," he makes "I'll be the One/ I'll see this through" sound worthy of a Shakespeare sonnet, and he transforms "One More Day" into a lovely sickbed-side lament. Yet he also pulls off the frank denunciation of American jingoism "'Merican"; establishing love of our culture with "I come from the land of Ben Franklin/ Twain and Poe and Walt Whitman/ Otis Redding, Ellington," he continues, "But it's the land of the slaves and the Klu Klux Klan/ The Haymarket Riot, Joe McCarthy, Vietnam/ Sickest joke I know."

Even the sole bout of puerile juvenility here ("Blast Off") is redeemed by some sensible high school advice for the uncool and physically threatened on "Mass Nerder"-"Gonna kick their asses in class/ Gonna get good grades!" And the title track, a killer outsider ode, just reinforces that notion.

"So many bands stole (and ruined) the Descendents' style it's a relief to finally have the real McCoy back-and sounding even better than the last time they came back, with 1996's first-rate Everything Sucks. They haven't changed an iota since their 1982 landmark Milo Goes to College, but with songs this catchy, so what? Bill Stevenson remains a propulsive drummer, blasting out mighty snare and tom fills, while bassist Karl Alvarez and chrome-domed guitarist Stephen Egerton feed off his power-push with a stretched-to-breaking dash. But of course these three also do the same for the undervalued All-the core of the Descendents' appeal is the universally beloved Milo Aukerman.

Other singers are also smart, sincere, nakedly honest, or simply expressive. But none combines these qualities as thoroughly as Aukerman, whom you'd swear was your closest friend. On ""Maddie,"" he makes ""I'll be the One/ I'll see this through"" sound worthy of a Shakespeare sonnet, and he transforms ""One More Day"" into a lovely sickbed-side lament. Yet he also pulls off the frank denunciation of American jingoism ""'Merican""; establishing love of our culture with ""I come from the land of Ben Franklin/ Twain and Poe and Walt Whitman/ Otis Redding, Ellington,"" he continues, ""But it's the land of the slaves and the Klu Klux Klan/ The Haymarket Riot, Joe McCarthy, Vietnam/ Sickest joke I know.""

Even the sole bout of puerile juvenility here (""Blast Off"") is redeemed by some sensible high school advice for the uncool and physically threatened on ""Mass Nerder""-""Gonna kick their asses in class/ Gonna get good grades!"" And the title track, a killer outsider ode, just reinforces that notion.

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