Swipe

Fingerprints Music

For nearly 30 years, Parker has coupled punk's energy with his love of American R&B, country and soul that has rightly earned him a spot in rock's pantheon of original and influential figures. YOUR COUNTRY i's a warm and emlodic genre-bending masterpiece. His songs go from Motown to Nashville to blistering rock to the keening lonesomeness of of a weary troubadour.
For nearly 30 years, Parker has coupled punk's energy with his love of American R&B, country and soul that has rightly earned him a spot in rock's pantheon of original and influential figures. YOUR COUNTRY i's a warm and emlodic genre-bending masterpiece. His songs go from Motown to Nashville to blistering rock to the keening lonesomeness of of a weary troubadour.
744302010625

Details

Format: CD
Label: BLDH
Catalog: 20106
Rel. Date: 03/09/2004
UPC: 744302010625

Your Country
Artist: Graham Parker
Format: CD
New: In Stock and available for pick up $11.98 Used: In Stock and available for pick up
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Anything for a Laugh
2. Rest Is History, The
3. Cruel Lips
4. Almost Thanksgiving Day
5. Nation of Shopkeepers
6. Queen of Compromise
7. Things I've Never Said
8. Sugaree
9. Tornado Alley
10. Fairground
11. Crawling from the Wreckage (Revisited)

More Info:

For nearly 30 years, Parker has coupled punk's energy with his love of American R&B, country and soul that has rightly earned him a spot in rock's pantheon of original and influential figures. YOUR COUNTRY i's a warm and emlodic genre-bending masterpiece. His songs go from Motown to Nashville to blistering rock to the keening lonesomeness of of a weary troubadour.

Reviews:

You don't have to look twice at the CD jacket to know this is Graham Parker, not Gram Parsons. But it's also the veteran rocker's twang turn, where he lets his vaunted howlin' wind of sound blow a few tumbleweeds around. This really isn't a stretch for Parker. After all, he came out of Britain's pub rock scene, which in the mid '70s was playing with more twang than you heard in country's Top 10 of the time. Parker hasn't lost any of his acerbic wit or observational skills over the years; he delivers richly drawn characters at the "Fairground" and in "Tornado Alley" and ruminates on love and aging in songs such as "The Rest Is History," "Cruel Lips" (an inconsequential duet with Lucinda Williams) "Queen of Compromise" and "Things I've Never Said." Parker sounds perfectly at home on the instrumental end, too, breathing rockabilly energy into "Queen of Compromise," "Tornado Alley" and the pleasantly surprising nod to his past, "Crawling From the Wreckage (Revisited)." "Fairground" boasts a rollicking Zydeco flavor, while "Almost Thanksgiving Day" is Parker's visit to Dylan's Nashville Skyline overlook. He offers up a faithful take on the Grateful Dead's "Sugaree" as well as gently loping pieces such as "The Rest Is History" and weepers like "Things I've Never Said." Nashville-or, for that matter, Bakersfield-will hardly tremble in their collective boots at Parker's arrival, but they'll certainly welcome the visit, even if it's something other than sparks he's squeezing out these days.

"You don't have to look twice at the CD jacket to know this is Graham Parker, not Gram Parsons. But it's also the veteran rocker's twang turn, where he lets his vaunted howlin' wind of sound blow a few tumbleweeds around. This really isn't a stretch for Parker. After all, he came out of Britain's pub rock scene, which in the mid '70s was playing with more twang than you heard in country's Top 10 of the time. Parker hasn't lost any of his acerbic wit or observational skills over the years; he delivers richly drawn characters at the ""Fairground"" and in ""Tornado Alley"" and ruminates on love and aging in songs such as ""The Rest Is History,"" ""Cruel Lips"" (an inconsequential duet with Lucinda Williams) ""Queen of Compromise"" and ""Things I've Never Said."" Parker sounds perfectly at home on the instrumental end, too, breathing rockabilly energy into ""Queen of Compromise,"" ""Tornado Alley"" and the pleasantly surprising nod to his past, ""Crawling From the Wreckage (Revisited)."" ""Fairground"" boasts a rollicking Zydeco flavor, while ""Almost Thanksgiving Day"" is Parker's visit to Dylan's Nashville Skyline overlook. He offers up a faithful take on the Grateful Dead's ""Sugaree"" as well as gently loping pieces such as ""The Rest Is History"" and weepers like ""Things I've Never Said."" Nashville-or, for that matter, Bakersfield-will hardly tremble in their collective boots at Parker's arrival, but they'll certainly welcome the visit, even if it's something other than sparks he's squeezing out these days.

"
back to top